Monday, 10 April 2017

AMM - The Crypt, 12th June 1968 - The Complete Session (rel. 1992)

There's nothing like blowing the cobwebs away at the start of a new week with nearly two hours' worth of fearsome, ear-blasting free improvisation, so enjoy.  A decade before Throbbing Gristle were terrifying London audiences (including at The Crypt), and three years before Kluster recorded Eruption, there was AMM at their most unhinged.

Wishing to stake out territory far beyond free jazz, Eddie Prévost, Keith Rowe and Lou Gare hooked up with pianist/composer Cornelius Cardew and percussionist Christopher Hobbs to make this glorious racket.  Prévost continues with versions of the group to this day.  First released as a an extract on one side of a shared LP, more of the Crypt performance was given a double-LP release in 1981 before the complete recording came out in 1992 on this 2-CD edition.

Fades where they occur are when tapes ran out; other than that, all 109 minutes of the show are here for your, erm, enjoyment, and actually it's not all quite as extreme as it starts out.  Long passages of meditative, near-ambient formlessness crop up at intervals; often I just pick a random 20 minute section of The Crypt to listen to, and always find something new to focus on.

Disc 1
Disc 2
alt. link (zippy) CD1
alt. link (zippy) CD2 

10 comments:

  1. Heart and soul, yin and yang, right-brain left-brain duality? I don't know. While I will be forever devoted to The Blessed Derek Bailey, Keith Rowe has a different fascination for me, so anything I can find that he is involved is welcome. Thanks very much for this!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Any chance you could mirror this somewhere other than mega?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. considering doing zippy alongside mega (when I have a bit of spare time) - watch this space.

      out of interest, what are the issues with Mega that make it problematic for some people? (Genuine question, to try to understand what might work for some browsers and not for others.)

      Delete
    2. The only issue I've encountered is with the browser used. Mega isn't compatible with Safari, but it works fine with Chrome. There may be a 24 hour data cap without a subscription, but I think it's like 2 to 4 gb, so unless you're dealing with large files, that's usually not an issue. I use and like Zippy, but there is that 200mb file size limit and the deletion of files 30 days after the last download.

      Delete
    3. Personally, I have an old computer with old browsers that simply cannot be updated, and I refuse to fork over the dough for a new computer until the one I have truly kicks the bucket.

      Zippy, MF, Google Drive, Deposit Files, Sendspace, Yandex... all of these and more still work and work well on outdated OSs'; mega in my experience refuses to work with anything less than the bloodiest of bleeding edge technology.

      Delete
    4. Thank you. Forgot to mention, zippy seems to have this nasty little... failsafe? Hard to call it that but I can't think of the proper term. Whatever it is, you only have a short window of opportunity to click the "download now" button and get, you know, the actual download: if you wait to long, the button becomes frozen as a background element and if you click it, it just sends you to one of the numerous adverts. Of course I'm glad to get this, just food for thought to consider for the future. A lot of blogs diversify their mirrors so one post it could be MF and Deposit, another it could be Yandex and ADrive, etc. then again a lot of other blogs stick to two or three of the same service and they still work years later so it's ultimately a matter of preference I suppose. Thanks again.

      Delete
  3. A classic cobweb blower! I imagine it's cleared a few rooms as well. I hate big crowds anyway. Thx!

    ReplyDelete
  4. What a record! Got the Matchless box set through recommended records in '81....but not this.Great stuff.
    ps....check out their brief major label appearence from '67 here:
    http://dieordiy2.blogspot.fr/2014/05/amm-ammmusic-elektra-euk-256-1967.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. From the era when the majors would take real risks!

      Delete